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The ACFR team has demonstrated SwagBot autonomously spot spraying weeds on a grazing property near Marulan, New South Wales. SwagBot can be seen automatically detecting and spraying serrated tussock. This solution has the potential to significantly reduce the burden of ongoing weed management.

SwagBot has been designed for the grazing livestock industry to assist with a range of tasks including weed control, animal monitoring and pasture surveys.

Serrated tussock is a highly invasive weed found throughout temperate Australia. It is a threat to native grasslands through reduced biodiversity, and has a severe impact on agricultural productivity.

SwagBot demonstrated at Nevertire

 

SwagBot was recently demonstrated at a cattle station near Nevertire, NSW.  SwagBot is a lightweight, electric vehicle designed to collect data on pasture and livestock.  Local farmers were shown how SwagBot can automatically detect and spray weeds in grazing land using various spray attachments.  The team also completed aerial surveying of the property which will be used to develop farm maps and resources for weed mapping.

Thank you to Central West Local Land Services for organising the event.

Our initial tests of SwagBot last month have been featured in media outlets around the world.

National articles include: ABC Rural7 NewsTodaySBS and 2Ser

International articles include: New ScientistIEEE SpectrumMashableCNETThe Telegraph UK, Popular Science, Popular MechanicsEngadgetThe EnquirerQuartzGizmodoTech InsiderModern Farmer, New AtlasThe Times of India and Reuters.

Upcoming trials will focus on applying research toward autonomous farm activities including monitoring and interacting with plants and animals.

Meet SwagBot – our latest farming robot. SwagBot proved successful in its first field test. SwagBot successfully demonstrated the ability to operate in the rugged cattle station environment. Future trials will focus on applying research toward autonomous farm activities including monitoring and interacting with plants and animals.

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